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2016 Sales Tax Holidays

Sales tax holidays are a chance for consumers to get a discount and a break on common purchases. Many states offer these holidays once or twice a year, often coinciding with back to school or other times when purchases are extensive for the needs of the family.

For traditional retailers, these holidays are familiar, and for consumers they are great. But for only retailers who may not be prepared for the sudden shift in tax collection requirements, they can create immediate headaches. To help you prepare for the year ahead, here are the 2016 sales tax holidays and how they will affect your collections in the states listed below.

This list is current as of February 7, 2016. New tax holidays will be added if added by specific states.

Alabama

NOTE: In Alabama, counties and municipalities are permitted to choose whether they participate in these holidays. You can review a list of those that are participating on the Alabama Department of Revenue website.

February 26-28, 2016

August 5-7, 2016

Arkansas

August 6-7, 2016

Connecticut

August 21-27, 2016

Florida

August 5-7, 2016

Georgia

July 30-31, 2016

Iowa

August 5-6, 2016

Louisiana

May 28-29, 2016

August 5-6, 2016

September 4-6, 2016

Maryland

February 13-15, 2016

August 14-20, 2016

Mississippi

July 29-30, 2016

September 2-4, 2016

Missouri

April 19-25, 2016

August 5-7, 2016

New Mexico

August 5-7, 2016

Ohio

August 5-7, 2016

Oklahoma

August 5-7, 2016

South Carolina

August 5-7, 2016

Tennessee

July 29-31, 2016

Texas

April 23-25, 2016

May 28-30, 2016

August 5-7, 2016

Virginia

August 5-7, 2016

Additional Sales Tax Holidays

The states listed above as well as other states not listed may add new sales tax holidays in the future, so keep this page bookmarked for potential updates. They will be added and noted if a new sales tax holiday is created by a state during 2016.

For those that sell items on Amazon, keep in mind that the retailer will automatically remove the sales tax requirement on purchases that are eligible during these periods, as long as you correctly tag each of the items you sell properly. Amazon’s tax code guide provides in-depth details on which codes should be used for this to work properly.